Study Evaluates How Divorce Rates Influenced by Field of Work

Study Evaluates How Divorce Rates Influenced by Field of Work

Researchers have long studied the effects of people’s jobs on various factors of their lives, including their health, happiness, stress levels and financial security. It should come as no surprise, therefore, that certain fields of work can have more of a toll on relationships than others, resulting in increased divorce rates for those who serve in them.

Below are some of the key findings from a study conducted in the journal Biology Letters, which analyzed data from 102,453 men and 113,252 women:

  • Men who worked in fields dominated by other men (such as construction) had significantly lower risk of divorce than women who worked in those same fields.
  • Men who worked in fields primarily dominated by women were more likely to get a divorce.
  • The job sectors that showed the highest divorce risk for men and women alike were those that required significant amounts of social interaction. This was particularly noticeable in the hospitality industries.
  • The professionals that had the lowest risk of divorce were farmers and librarians.
  • Men who worked around lots of women were more likely to get a divorce than women who worked around lots of men.
  • College-educated men faced much higher risk of divorce in female-dominated fields than men with less education.
  • Women with less education faced much higher risk of divorce in male-dominated fields than women with a college education.

The questions that come out of this study are just as interesting as these results. For example, what cultural factors lead to this disparity of men in female-dominated fields getting divorced versus women in male-dominated fields getting divorced?

If you are looking to get a divorce and need more information about the process before you begin, consult a trusted Long Island divorce lawyer with Bryan L. Salamone & Associates.

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